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This is how many U.S. jobs robots will create over the next 10 years

Everett Collection

One new job will be created for ever 15 lost to automation.

But will enough jobs be created to overcome the massive employment losses?

While much hay has been made about the sizable number of jobs that will be lost to automation, the workplace’s robotic revolution will also come with a new wave of hiring.

Close to 15 million new jobs will be created in the U.S. over the next decade as a direct result of automation and artificial intelligence, equivalent to 10% of the workforce, according to estimates in a new report from Forrester Research, a market research company. Those gains, however, will not come close to offsetting the 25 million jobs that technology will eliminate by 2027, Forrester predicts.

’New human resources employees will be devoted to guiding staff as robots enter the workplace.’

The new jobs will be created “in software, engineering, design, maintenance, support, training, or another specific job area,” the report found. A new generation of lawyers will be needed to regulate the interactions between human employees and robot workers, for example. And new human resources employees will be devoted to guiding staff as robots enter the workplace.

Jobs won’t just be created or lost, though. Forrester estimated that at least 25% of all jobs will be transformed in terms of responsibilities as a result of increased automation, including in finance, medicine and even farming.

Automation is eliminating jobs for factory workers and Uber drivers—will your morning fix soon come from a precision caffeine machine? WSJ’s Geoffrey A. Fowler tastes the new robot lattes at San Francisco’s Cafe X.

The debate regarding automation and artificial intelligence’s effect on U.S. employment remains far from settled. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin has predicted it could take up to a century for AI to eliminate jobs.

But there is reason to be cautious about the new wave of workplace robots. The number of jobs lost may depend on how many bots are actually deployed. A study by economists from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Boston University argued that six workers will lose their positions for every robot added.

Blue collar workers, including ones that feature routine manual labor or assembly-line production, were expected to be hardest hit alongside people without a college education, the economists found. Furthermore, automation was estimated to result in no meaningful positive employment gains for any occupation, that study concluded.

Via: This is how many U.S. jobs robots will create over the next 10 years 

How to Build a Brand When You Think You Have Nothing 

By; Jeremy Slate

There’s nothing that is worse and more annoying to others than repeatedly asking people to do things for you. If you never learn to be a person of value, then you will never achieve a high level of success. That’s not to say that you should just give only to receive, it feels wrong because it is wrong.

You should be giving as much as you possibly can because you are inspired by the mission of others and want to see them reach even higher levels of success. Then you really start to envision the success that you see for yourself.

Nine months ago, I started the Create Your Own Life Podcast with no money, no business, and from what I thought, nothing to give. I quickly learned that I had to shift my mindset from scarcity and thinking the success of others would detract from my success; it’s just not true.

The following are some strategies that I have applied and observed in others that are on their way to a high level of success.

1. Connect people to other people.

Do you know two successful people that would create amazing things with each other? Connect them. Help them to expand their circle of influence and get their mission out there. It’s truly an amazing feeling knowing you are helping someone reach higher stratospheres. When you do this from a real and genuine place of admiring someone’s mission, you will be starting to turn the wheels of fate for yourself as well.

2. Offer Free Service.

When you’re not well known, you may have a great skill set but no one may know about it. Offer your service for free or a reduced rate to help it get out there. Helping the right person to be successful is something that can help you get to a place of being able to charge whatever you want.

3. Start a podcast.

John Lee Dumas started the Entrepreneur on Fire podcast after a military career and a set of business exploits that didn’t quite work out. Within 9 months, John started being profitable and in his first year and a half, he had multiple six-figure months. John also managed to connect with many of his heroes including Barbara Corcoran, Tim Ferriss, Gary Vaynerchuk and Lewis Howes.It’s a valuable vehicle and I’ve found it to be some of the most valuable networking that I’ve ever done. Finish all your interviews with “How can I help you?” and you’ll be surprised at how many amazing opportunities will come your way.

4. Offer to be a Contributor.

Look for all the publications in your niche, and make yourself a spreadsheet. Start with the ones that may be the easiest to get into and tell them why you have the credibility and then give them 3-5 topic ideas that you are able to write. Then, you are giving yourself a greater chance of being published, because you’re actually giving the publisher options. As you begin to get some writing under your belt, then you can use it to get more opportunities on higher-level publications.

5. Ask an Influencer How You Can Help.

A great name for this action is the “Osuna Rule.” 19-year-old Ulyses Osuna has very quickly connected with a lot of influencers and produced great results. His results have led to rave reviews from individuals such as Ryan Stewman, Patrick Bet-David, and Shawn Thomas. He has quickly become of great value to individuals that have the power to propel his career to the next level. Did I mention he’s less than 20 years of age?

The point here is that there is always an option if you are able to make the shift from what I can get, to what I can give, you will truly receive abundance. Some will always play the victim and think they need to rely upon others to give them life; a losing viewpoint.

In fact, you have the ability to create your own life. If you learn how to be valuable to others, then you really have the power and are not coming from a place of lack but a place of abundance.Opinions expressed here by Contributors are their own.

Jeremy Slate
Jeremy Slate is the founder of the Create Your Own Life Podcast which helps entrepreneurs live the lives they know they were meant to. He studied literature at Oxford University, Specializes in using Online social networking to build and offline relationship and was ranked #1 in iTunes New and Noteworthy. It is because of Jeremy’s success in podcasting that he was able to accomplish 10,000 downloads of his podcast in the first month. After his success in podcasting, Jeremy Slate and Daniel Gefen founded GetFeatured.media to help entrepreneurs get their message out by appearing as guests on featured podcasts.

Via: How to Build a Brand When You Think You Have Nothing

life lessons you wish you had learned in college but probably didn’t

I’ve gotten the opportunity to speak with a number of college students over the past few years. I’m always impressed at how far ahead of the game most of these students are from where I was at their age. At these talks, I mostly try to share my story and tell them some of the stuff I wish someone had told me about when I was in school.

This week I talked to a business class at Grand Valley State University. I wrote down a few notes beforehand and expanded on some of those thoughts here with some advice I wish I would have gotten in college:

Passion is overrated. People always say “go into something you’re passionate about” but I’ve found it’s more effective to experiment and figure out what you’re good at first. I wasn’t one of those people who was reading The Wall Street Journal at age 10. I grew into my love of investing and the markets and only became passionate about it after spending some time doing the work. The same thing happened with writing.

Learn about behavioral psychology and human nature. You have to understand how humans generally function and how things like incentives, blind spots, and cognitive dissonance guide our actions. Human nature is a fascinating subject matter that far too few people ever take the time to study. Understanding your own biases and how other people are hardwired will help you understand much of how the world works.

Don’t just send out a bunch of resumes. Sending out hundreds of resumes to every open position on the internet is a terrible strategy for finding a job. You’ll never get noticed that way. It’s a much better strategy to personalize your resume and cover letter to a select few companies that you take your time to get to know first. You can also reach out to people in your chosen industry to pick their brain about how to work your way into certain companies. People love talking about themselves, so figure out how to invite people to coffee to help you understand how the working world really works. Building these networks can help you find open positions that never get posted as well.

Avoid defeatism at all costs. Don’t let people tell you the horrible job market is holding you back. Or student loans are crushing our young people. Or things were better in the 1990s. The headlines don’t run your life or make decisions for you. Don’t worry about what everyone else is doing. Focus on getting better and avoid negative people like the plague.

Think in terms of systems over goals. A goal would be: How do I accumulate $1 million? A system would be: How do I put processes in place to become wealthier over time? If you’re only focused on the end goal, it can make you feel like a letdown if you fall short. You can’t control life and all of its unpredictable outcomes, so it’s more important to implement good systems you can follow over and over again in hopes of putting the probabilities in your favor. That way, if and when you do fail, you’re not completely devastated and can move on to your next challenge with a plan already in place.

Avoid lifestyle creep. It’s not a bad idea to live like a college student for a couple of years right out of school until you get a handle on how to deal with money in the real world. At the very least, don’t turn into a lavish spender right when you get your first big paycheck. That’s a tough habit to kick. And make sure to read a few personal finance books. It’s one of the most important, yet ignored topics on becoming a functioning adult.

Start those 401(k) contributions right away. Saving money is the most important investment decision you can make, especially at a young age when you have the wind at your back in terms of human capital and compound interest. Increase how much you save a little each year, make it automatic and your future self will thank you.

Become a lifelong learner. One of the best ways to become smarter is to read as much as possible on a wide range of subjects. Being well-read can help level the playing field when you’re young and inexperienced. I’ve found that people who are well-read do far better than those who were born with a high intellect.

Understand the difference between being productive and being busy. The majority of the people I talk to who work 70-80-hour weeks are typically really busy but not really productive. Some jobs force you to do busy work, but figuring out how to manage your time productively is essential if you ever want a life outside the office or a fulfilling career.

Ask questions. You feel like an idiot at times, but one of the ways I learned on the job was simply by asking questions every time I didn’t understand something. Not only does this help you figure out what’s going on faster but it shows you’re interested. From there it’s up to you to become a fast learner so you can help solve other people’s problems.

Take care of your health. When I was in college I could eat fast food all the time and party until 2 am or 3 am and get up and turn it around easily the next day. That doesn’t work when you get older. You have to eat right, exercise and get enough sleep. This gives you more energy, you’ll feel better about yourself and hopefully live a longer life because of it.

Learn how to sell. Everyone is in some form of sales whether they understand it or not. You have to be able to sell yourself, your message, your product, your firm or your philosophy.

Take some risks. Move to a new city. Take a flier on a risky job. Don’t stay put in a company you hate working for. You don’t need your whole life mapped out right out of college. Take your risks when you have plenty of time to make up for them if something doesn’t work out. Everyone will tell you to play it safe, but don’t follow that path just because it’s the easy thing to do.

And finally, have fun and don’t take yourself too seriously. Life is all about balance. I’m glad I traveled for a few years before settling down with all of the responsibilities that come along with being an adult. Enjoy yourself when you’re young and energetic.

Via: life lessons you wish you had learned in college but probably didn’t 

These two colors make office workers more…

 ROBYN BECK/AFP
The colorful lobby of Facebook’s main campus in Menlo Park, Calif.

 

Employees may have an answer to that 3 o’clock energy dip.

Offices are increasingly being designed with collaboration in mind, as the lines between corporate meetings, private work sessions, and coffee dates with clients blur. While furniture and layout are often discussed, experts say there is a new frontier of workplace design they are just now tapping into: color.

Color — specifically, colored lighting — can affect productivity, according to an extensive body of research by Mariana Figueiro, a professor at the Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, a private research university.

Measuring “biomarkers” including brain activity, performance type and reaction times, as well as alertness and self-reported sleepiness, they found saturated blue colors are ideal for increasing alertness, especially for those who work a night shift. Light is denoted in nanometers, which measures its wavelength range and saturation of color. The blue they used, a 460 nanometer, affected the circadian system by simulating light from a daytime sky.

Lighting Research Center/Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
This is as close to 460-nanometer blue as you can get in the office without looking at the sky.

They have also found saturated red colors, specifically 640 nanometers of red, have a strong alerting effect without decreasing the hormone melatonin, which the blue light is known to do. “We have found having red light is like drinking a cup of coffee — it gives you alert effect without suppressing the melatonin.” “It’s novel and people are starting to think about these kinds of solutions,” she said.

Lighting Research Center/Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
An office wall close to 640 nanometers of red could help foster excitement and build energy.

Colors are also very important for office productivity, said Linda Sharkey, a human resources expert and co-author of “The Future-Proof Workplace,” a book that discusses office configurations and corporate strategies. She suggested engaging employees in the selection of the color scheme, even without considering a 460-nanometer blue. “Colors like red foster excitement and build energy,” she said. “Bright colors often help people spark ideas, while soothing colors like green and lighter blues help them relax.”

The researchers used a ‘460 nanometer’ blue, which affected the circadian system by simulating light from a daytime sky. It’s ideal for increasing alertness, especially during the night shift.

She has toured offices of major companies around the world, including Unilever’s UN, -0.36%   headquarters in London and Facebook’s FB, -0.25% campus in Menlo Park, Calif. In her travels, she has often noted that common areas are painted with bright colors, lending themselves to shared ideas, whereas spots for individual work and reflection are softer. This may help mitigate some of the perceived negative effects of open plan offices. Painting shared spaces with colors that lend themselves well to collaboration and private spaces with more subdued, individualized colors could help separate the environment mentally as well as physically.

Many workers could benefit from this kind of corporate color therapy. One recent study found 50% of people with open-office floor plans were unsatisfied with their sound privacy compared with only 16% of people in private offices. Meetings in those environments can exacerbate such frustrations, creating distractions for workers. Sharkey said most workers spend a large bulk of their time in the office, and the modern workplace is evolving to meet needs that were little-known in the past.

“A human is much more complex than people gave them credit for in the 20th century workplace,” she said. “We are just now starting to pay attention to that.”

Via: Scientists say these two colors make office workers more alert and productive

27-year-old entrepreneur made 7 figures in 18 months

Roger Jin with elderly volunteers at the warehouse, who he called the Grandmas, "because they're kind and nurturing."

Photo courtesy Treats
Roger Jin with elderly volunteers at the warehouse, who he called the Grandmas, “because they’re kind and nurturing.”

Roger Jin decided he wanted to be an entrepreneur when he was 14.

He was sitting in trigonometry class and had an overwhelming feeling that what he was learning wasn’t serving him. “I felt limited, and a great desire to attain the freedom of being the master of my own destiny,” Jin tells CNBC. “Even as a kid, I saw entrepreneurship as my only path towards that goal.”

Looking back, his only regret was that he didn’t drop out of school and start a business.

Jin doubled up on his course load and rushed through college in two and a half years. He immediately moved to East Palo Alto, Calif., in the heart of Silicon Valley, and crashed on his friend’s couch to work on his first startup idea, Bridge, an app and website that connected people with those nearby who have similar interests. Bridge didn’t work, so Jin got a job.

Home photo shoot in the early days of Treats.

Photo courtesy Treats
Home photo shoot in the early days of Treats.

In May 2015, on a trip to China, Jin went to a grocery store a where he bought Choco Pie, a chocolate-coated marshmallow snack. “I remembered thinking, ‘It’s a real shame most people from outside of Asia will never have a chance to try this,'” says Jin, in a recent Ask Me Anything on reddit. That thought was the seed of Jin’s next business idea.

Over the next three months, Jin laid the foundation of Treats, a subscription, mail-order international snack service. He built a website, identified wholesale distributors and found a warehouse where he could sort and ship packages.

Jin built the business from his living room with $5000 in savings. By late July 2015, Jin could accept orders through the website.

Except for the warehouse staff, everyone at Treats works remotely from home.

Photo courtesy Treats
Except for the warehouse staff, everyone at Treats works remotely from home.

Getting off the ground was a struggle. “During the first six months I felt like I was in a constant fight for survival — to build the company, launch it, and grow fast enough before I ran out of money,” says Jin in the reddit AMA.

And he took lots of risks, he recounts: “I put all my personal expenses on my credit card, racking up thousands in debt. I also took on personal and business loans to keep the company afloat as it was growing.”

An early Treats box.

Photo courtesy Treats
An early Treats box.

Jin got his very first customer by posting about his new company in his high school’s Facebook Group. He had attended an international high school in Shanghai and thought his classmates might miss the foods of their childhoods.

In December 2015, Jin started using the branded blue Treats boxes. That was a big month for growth, he says.

In 2016, Treats’ revenues hit seven figures, according to Jin, who declined to be more specific. The business currently has four full-time employees and two part-time employees besides Jin. In addition, he sub-contracts out the assembly of boxes and inventory management to Good Source, the fulfillment operation of Goodwill.

“I’m glad to do so because Good Source is a revenue arm for Goodwill, and they also employ down-on-their-luck people who may have a hard time getting jobs elsewhere (due to past criminal records, etc.),” says Jin.

Treats is headquartered in San Francisco but everyone, including Jin, works remotely.

Treats boxes being assembled at the warehouse.

Photo courtesy Treats
Treats boxes being assembled at the warehouse.

“I’m a bit of an underdog in Silicon Valley because up this point I’ve been a solo founder, I don’t code, and I’m not very plugged into the Silicon Valley investor scene,” says Jin, who, so far, hasn’t raised any outside capital. “A lot of start-up ideas can’t exist without funding because they don’t generate revenue for a while and instead requires burning cash to build out the initial product.”

While Jin is still building Treats, he is already looking towards his next independent venture too. As he puts it, “Part of my intent for starting Treats from the beginning was to build it into a successful business so that I would have cash reserves and inflow that could use to bootstrap the next business that I decide to work on, and do so without having to necessarily rely on any outside capital (at least not until the product gains traction).”

Via: 27-year-old entrepreneur made 7 figures in 18 months

‘Parenting Is …’

Dutch illustrator Liesbeth Ton knows the highs and lows of parenting all too well. The Los Angeles-based artist and mom has three kids, ages 10, 7 and 2, and often channels her day-to-day frustrations into quirky comics.

Her latest series, “Parenting Is …” tackles the messes, exhaustion and total loss of privacy that come with raising kids. It also captures the simple moments of joy and indescribable love.

BETJE
Ton’s latest series, “Parenting Is …” tackles the messes, exhaustion and total loss of privacy that come with raising kids.

“I’ve been making parenting cartoons for a while and they were mostly about the struggles,” Ton told The Huffington Post. “I still like that subject, but I thought it would be nice to show more of the whole picture. My life got twice as hard and twice as much fun and meaningful since we had kids.”

For the illustrator, this series is all about seeing the beauty in the mess and exhaustion. “Parenting is hard and we’re all so busy that sometimes we forget to notice what we enjoy,” she said. “I hope to remind people of those little things that make parenting so worthwhile. Like watching them sleep, snotty cuddles and going on adventures in the back yard.”

Ton shares her comics on her website, InstagramFacebook and Tapastic pages. She also sells postcards of her work online.

Keep scrolling to see her “Parenting Is …” illustrations.

Via: ‘Parenting Is …’ Comics Showcase The Highs And Lows Of Raising Kids 

‘Parenting Is …’ Comics Showcase The Highs And Lows Of Raising Kids 

Dutch illustrator Liesbeth Ton knows the highs and lows of parenting all too well. The Los Angeles-based artist and mom has three kids, ages 10, 7 and 2, and often channels her day-to-day frustrations into quirky comics.

Her latest series, “Parenting Is …” tackles the messes, exhaustion and total loss of privacy that come with raising kids. It also captures the simple moments of joy and indescribable love.

BETJE
Ton’s latest series, “Parenting Is …” tackles the messes, exhaustion and total loss of privacy that come with raising kids.

“I’ve been making parenting cartoons for a while and they were mostly about the struggles,” Ton told The Huffington Post. “I still like that subject, but I thought it would be nice to show more of the whole picture. My life got twice as hard and twice as much fun and meaningful since we had kids.”

For the illustrator, this series is all about seeing the beauty in the mess and exhaustion. “Parenting is hard and we’re all so busy that sometimes we forget to notice what we enjoy,” she said. “I hope to remind people of those little things that make parenting so worthwhile. Like watching them sleep, snotty cuddles and going on adventures in the back yard.”

Ton shares her comics on her website, InstagramFacebook and Tapastic pages. She also sells postcards of her work online.

Keep scrolling to see her “Parenting Is …” illustrations.

Via: ‘Parenting Is …’ Comics Showcase The Highs And Lows Of Raising Kids 

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