2017’s 5 Biggest Fashion Trends – What Styles Are In and Out for 2017

With a new year brings trends that we’re ready to welcome into the fold and others that can see themselves out. But which is which? Read on for insider info from the pros at Saks Fifth Avenue, Bloomingdale’s, The Shoebox, and other major retailers.

IN:Stripes are the equivalent to what a white t-shirt used to be back in the day,” says Roopal Patel, fashion director of Saks Fifth Avenue. “They have nine lives. We’ve seen the trend now for two to three seasons and it will continue to carry forward.

IN: “Sneakers will continue to be extremely popular in the upcoming year,” advises Gennie Yi, Intermix’s buyer of designer and ready-to-wear. “Because of their versatility, you can never have too many. Glitter, leopard, and satin updates to sneakers effortlessly dress up an outfit and give you a reason to buy multiplepairs.”

IN: “There was an artistically inspired theme across the runways,” says Kate Foley, contributing fashion director of Vestiaire Collective. “From Roksanda and Céline to J.W.Anderson, Proenza Schouler, Marni, Valentino, and many other brands, whether directly inspired by a particular artist’s work, painterly prints, or patterns, strong art references will be here to stay in 2017.”

IN: “There is a new attitude shift toward ‘easy elegance‘ going into spring 2017,” says Brooke Jaffe, Bloomingdale’s OVP and fashion director of ready-to-wear. “The influence of athletic-inspired pieces will continue.”

IN: “One shoe trend we see really taking over in 2017 is the mule,” says Sean Kirschenbaum co-owner of The Shoebox.Flat mules, low block-heel mules, heeled mules, sneaker mules, espadrille mules—mules in all fabrications and colors including velvet, satin, canvas, and embroidery. They were big for 2016 and they will be even bigger for 2017.”

OUT: “Corsets had such a huge moment this year, but I’m not sure if I see designers continuing this into 2017 after the trend was covered in such a major way in the press,” says Foley.

OUT: “A huge change is coming in the denim world,” warns Jaffe.  “Skinny jeans with stretch have reigned supreme for a long time but we anticipate a shift toward contrast denim styles in vintage silhouettes.”

OUT: “There’s a fresher graphic interpretation of the sweet and romantic trends of 2016,” says Yi. “The tulip flare has moved onto a sharper asymmetric hemline, the soft lingerie-dressing look has evolved into strong and powerful corsetry details, and the romantic and luxe velvets of the past are now modernized with an easy-to-wear attitude.

OUT: “Heels four to five inches or higher have been a trend that we have seen rapidly decrease,” notes  Kirschenbaum. “Women nowadays are way more focused on comfort and practicality (and value investing in a shoe that is both stylish and comfortable enough to walk or commute in) which is why there has been such an increase in demand for sneakers and low block-heels.”

OUT: “I think we’re starting to see that clean classic sneakers are not as exciting anymore,” says Patel. “It’s now about sneakers that are embellished or have something like emojis or logos on them.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Via: 2017’s 5 Biggest Fashion Trends – What Styles Are In and Out for 2017

What Successful People (Who Are Actually Happy) Do Differently 

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Achievement rarely produces the sense of lasting happiness that you think it will. Once you finally accomplish the goal you’ve been chasing, two new goals tend to pop up unexpectedly.

We long for new achievements because we quickly habituate to what we’ve already accomplished. This habituation to success is as inevitable as it is frustrating, and it’s more powerful than you realize.

The key to beating habituation is to pursue, what researchers call, enduring accomplishments. Unlike run-of-the-mill accomplishments that produce fleeting happiness, the pleasure from enduring accomplishments lasts long after that initial buzz. Enduring accomplishments are so critical that they separate those who are successful and happy from those who are always left wanting more.

Researchers from the Harvard Business School studied this phenomenon by interviewing and assessing professionals who had attained great success. The aim was to break down what these exceptional professionals did differently to achieve both long-lasting and fulfilling success.

The researchers found that people who were both successful and happy over the long term intentionally structured their activities around four major needs:

Happiness: They pursued activities that produced pleasure and satisfaction.

Achievement: They pursued activities that got tangible results.

Significance:
They pursued activities that made a positive impact on the people who matter most.

Legacy: They pursued activities through which they could pass their values and knowledge on to others.

Lasting fulfillment comes when you pursue activities that address all four of these needs. When any one of them is missing, you get a nagging sense that you should be doing more (or something different).

The behaviors that follow are the hallmarks of people who are successful and happy because they address these four needs. Try them out and see what they do for you.

1. They are passionate.
Jane Goodall left her home in England and moved to Tanzania at age 26 to begin studying chimpanzees. It became her life’s work, and Goodall has devoted herself fully to her cause while inspiring many others to do the same. Successful, happy people don’t just have interests; they have passions, and they devote themselves completely to them.

2. They swim against the current. There’s a reason that successful and happy people tend to be a little, well, different. To be truly successful and happy, you have to follow your passions and values no matter the costs. Just think what the world would have missed out on if Bill Gates or Richard Branson had played it safe and stayed in school or if Stephen King hadn’t spent every free second he had as teacher writing novels. To swim against the current, you have to be willing to take risks.


“To be normal is the ideal aim of the unsuccessful.”
– Carl Jung

3. They finish what they start. Coming up with a great idea means absolutely nothing if you don’t execute that idea. The most successful and happy people bring their ideas to fruition, deriving just as much satisfaction from working through the complications and daily grind as they do from coming up with the initial idea. They know that a vision remains a meaningless thought until it is acted upon. Only then does it begin to grow.

4. They are resilient. To be successful and happy in the long term, you have to learn to make mistakes, look like an idiot, and try again, all without flinching. In a recent study at the College of William and Mary, researchers interviewed over 800 entrepreneurs and found that the most successful among them tended to have two critical things in common: they were terrible at imagining failure, and they tended not to care what other people thought of them. In other words, the most successful entrepreneurs put no time or energy into stressing about their failures as they see failure as a small and necessary step in the process of reaching their goals.

5. They make their health a priority. There are an absurd number of links between your health, happiness, and success. I’ve beaten them to death over the years, but the absolute essential health habits that successful and happy people practice consistently are good sleep hygiene (fights stress, improves focus, and is great for your mood), eating healthy food (helps you to focus), and exercise (great for energy levels and confidence).

6. They don’t dwell on problems. Where you focus your attention determines your emotional state. By fixating on your problems, you create and prolong negative emotions and stress, which hinder performance. However, by focusing on actions to better yourself and your circumstances, you can create a sense of personal efficacy that produces positive emotions and improves performance. Successful, happy people don’t dwell on problems because they know that they’re most effective when they focus on solutions.

7. They celebrate other people’s successes.
Insecure people constantly doubt their relevance, and because of this, they try to steal the spotlight and criticize others in order to prove their worth. Confident people, on the other hand, aren’t worried about their relevance because they draw their self-worth from within. Instead of insecurely focusing inward, confident people focus outward, which allows them to see all the wonderful things that other people bring to the table. Praising people for their contributions is a natural result of this.

8. They live outside the box.
Successful and happy people haven’t arrived at where they are by thinking in the same way as everyone else. While others stay in their comfort-zone prisons and invest all their energy in reinforcing their existing beliefs, successful people are out challenging the status quo and exposing themselves to new ideas.

9. They keep an open mind. Exposing yourself to a variety of people is useless if you spend that time disagreeing with them and comforting yourself with your own opinions. Successful, happy people recognize that every perspective provides an opportunity for growth. You need to practice empathy by putting yourself in the other person’s shoes so that you can understand how their perspective makes sense (at least, to them). A great way to keep an open mind is to try to glean at least one interesting or useful thing from every conversation you have.

10. They don’t let anyone limit their joy.
When your sense of pleasure and satisfaction are derived from comparing yourself to others, you are no longer the master of your own happiness. When successful, happy people feel good about something that they’ve done, they don’t let anyone’s opinions or accomplishments take that away from them. While it’s impossible to turn off your reactions to what others think of you, you don’t have to compare yourself to others, and you can always take people’s opinions with a grain of salt. That way, no matter what other people are thinking or doing, your self-worth comes from within. Regardless of what people think of you at any particular moment, one thing is certain — you’re never as good or bad as they say you are.

Bringing It All Together

People who are successful and happy focus on activities that address a variety of needs, not just immediate achievements.

What other habits can make you happy and successful in the long term? Please share your thoughts in the comments section below, as I learn just as much from you as you do from me.

American Apparel Stores To Close After Canadian Purchase 

American Apparel is going Canadian.

The embattled clothing company is closing all of its retail stores and Los Angeles headquarters after its purchase last week by Montreal-based company Gildan Activewear, The Los Angeles Times reported.

All 110 American Apparel stores will close by the end of April, with as many as 3,400 employees expected to lose their jobs. The sale follows the once popular retailer ― whose logo was “Made in America – Sweatshop Free” ― filing for bankruptcy in 2015 and again last November.

“This was always about buying assets out of bankruptcy,” Gildan spokesman Garry Bell told the Times. “The reality is this wasn’t a purchase of an ongoing concern.”

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American Apparel’s retail stores and its Los Angeles headquarters, pictured, will close following its sale.

Gildan, whose brands include GoldToe socks and Anvil, has factories in Central America, the Caribbean, Bangladesh and the U.S., according to the company’s website. Currently, the only finished goods produced in the U.S. are socks, the Times reported.

Though the American Apparel brand will reportedly live on, it’s expected to be far different than it is today.

Analysts speaking to The Times forecast that the company likely will not keep its manufacturing operations in California, especially with the state planning to raise the minimum wage. Because Gildan’s clothing is sold through other retailers, the Times suggested that any future American Apparel items will be found in chain stores, like Kmart or Target, or through other wholesale buyers.

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American Apparel’s founder, Dov Charney, was fired in 2014 after being accused of sexual misconduct and misuse of company funds.

The company’s sale comes two years after its controversial Canadian-born founder, Dov Charney, was ousted in 2014 following allegations of sexual misconduct and misuse of company funds.

Today he is working on a new business, according to his website, that showcases an ongoing photography project titled “That’s Los Angeles.”

 

 

 

 

 

Via: American Apparel Stores To Close After Canadian Purchase 

Who Is Thylane Blondeau? 

We wouldn’t be surprised if you’ve already heard French model Thylane Blondeau’s name. The 15-year-old covered Vogue Enfants when she was just 6, and two years before that, she was walking down the Jean Paul Gaultier runway. If you’re assuming this caused a stir in the fashion industry, you’d be right — many people felt she was being objectified in the 2011 issue of Vogue Paris. But fast forward a few years, and Thylane scored a major spot on Jalouse and contracts with IMG Models and L’Oréal.

After she made her debut on the Cannes red carpet, mastering a look that was both playful and sophisticated, we were sure of it: Thylane is following in the footsteps of your favorite It girls. Read on to get to know her killer sense of style, then follow her feed so you don’t miss a beat. We promise that when it comes to Thylane’s career, things are about to move very fast.

 

 

 

 

 

V ia: Who Is Thylane Blondeau? 

Outfits That Never Go Out of Style 

Image Source: Mark Iantosca
With every runway and every new trend, I’m less enthused with what’s in my own closet. It’s more than an occupational hazard, and a common sentiment many women share: how to make our wardrobes functional and stylish each day so that we’re never the victims of “I have nothing to wear” syndrome again. The answer I’m finding isn’t always in stocking your closet with new stuff but in remembering the value of great essentials — and how to work them time and time again. So I’m going back to basics with nine timeless outfits you can rework and rewear any way you like. It starts here with a few easy formulas; just add and subtract to make them your own.

 

 

 

 

 

Via: Outfits That Never Go Out of Style

This tiny country is the most technologically advanced in the world

Have you ever been to Estonia? Could you find it on a map?

Estonia, in the Baltics, has completely transformed its economy by supporting startups

The Baltic nation of only 1.3 million citizens stands out from its Eastern European neighbors in that it has an advanced economy and a high standard of living. And it’s a technology paradise. You may know it as the home of Skype. But there’s a lot more to the tiny country than that.

In Estonia, voting, signing documents and filling out tax returns is done online, thanks to X-Road, an online tool that coordinates multiple online data repositories and document registries. X-Road provides all Estonians — ordinary citizens, enterprises and government officials — with unparalleled access to the data they need to do business, get licenses, permits and other documents that would take days, weeks or even months in other countries.

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X-Road is built with scalability in mind, so that the growing number of services and repositories can easily be attached to the system. Although this digital backbone alone is rather impressive, it’s just one of many products in tech-forward Estonia.

Instead of being held back by its past and falling victim to ailments that plague many post-communist countries, such as corruption, a bloated government and an obsolete education system, Estonia has decided to start with a clean slate and invest in its future. To transform its society into a community of tech-savvy individuals, children as young as 7 are taught the principles and basics of coding. (In comparison, only one in four schools in the U.S. teaches computer programming.)

Such strong foundations have yielded impressive results: Estonians are driven, forward-thinking and entrepreneurial, and the same goes for the government. It takes only five minutes to register a company there and, according to The Economist, the country in 2013 held the world record for the number of startups per person. And it’s not quantity over quality: Many Estonian startups are now successful companies that you may recognize, such as Skype, Transferwise, Pipedrive, Cloutex, Click & Grow, GrabCAD, Erply, Fortumo, Lingvist and others. By the way, Estonia uses the euro.

If all this sounds enticing and you wish to become an entrepreneur there, you’re in luck; starting a business in Estonia is easy, and you can do it without packing your bags, thanks to its e-residency service, a transnational digital identity available to anyone. An e-resident can not only establish a company in Estonia through the Internet, but they can also have access to other online services that have been available to Estonians for over a decade. This includes e-banking and remote money transfers, declaring Estonian taxes online, digitally signing and verifying contracts and documents, and much more.

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E-residents are issued a smart ID card, a legal equivalent to handwritten signatures and face-to-face identification in Estonia and worldwide. The cards themselves are protected by 2048-bit encryption, and the signature/ID functionality is provided by two security certificates stored on the card’s microchip.

But great innovations don’t stop there. Blockchain, the principle behind bitcoin that also secures the integrity of e-residency data, will be used to provide unparalleled safety to 1 million Estonian health records. The blockchain will be used to register any and all changes, illicit or otherwise, done to the health records, protecting their authenticity and effectively eliminating any abuse of the data therein.

While there are many lessons that the U.S. and the rest of the world can learn from Estonia, these are especially important: A country must be willing to adapt and change the infrastructure of both the government and the economy if needed, and to continually optimize them. A nation needs to understand that a change of mindset should be thorough and start with the young. An education system should be designed in a way that doesn’t cripple young minds, or overburden them with too much irrelevant information. And, finally, if you want entrepreneurship to thrive, it is necessary to remove bureaucratic and technical obstacles at all levels.

Man Paid DMV With 298,745 Pennies In Pettiest Revenge Scheme Ever 

Nick Stafford’s five wheel barrels full of loose coins.

The DMV has driven one man to do something extraordinary.

On Dec. 11, Nick Stafford pushed five wheel barrels full of loose coins into Department of Motor Vehicles in Lebanon, Virginia, according to a statement he made on his company’s website.

Stafford, who has been fighting with DMV for months, decided to pay $2,987.14 in taxes on his car with 298,745 pennies. The facility’s automated coin-counting machine couldn’t handle the load, and employees were forced to count the 1,548 pounds of change by hand. Stafford said that he arrived at the DMV at 9 a.m. Wednesday and staff was not done counting the pennies until early Thursday morning, the BBC reports.

The whole thing stemmed from a longstanding grudge against the department.

“You may ask, why go though all this trouble?” Stafford wrote on his website. “In 2016 I paid nearly $300,000 just in state and federal income taxes and I have zero tolerance for any government employee refusing to follow the laws of the Commonwealth, that’s why.”

In September, Stafford tried to call his local DMV to ask what he calls a “30 second question” about where to register his car and pay the sales tax, since he owns multiple houses in the area.

The phone number listed online put him on hold for over an hour. A direct line to the Lebanon DMV wasn’t listed online, so he made a Freedom of Information Act request for the number, which he was given.

When Stafford called, the person who answered told him he wasn’t allowed to call that number and hung up on him. He called the same number repeatedly until he finally had his question answered. Yet, to “prove a point” he called the number again and requested the private, unlisted numbers of nine other DMV offices in Virginia.

The Lebanon DMV refused, so Stafford took them to court.

“If they were going to inconvenience me then I was going to inconvenience them,” he told the Bristol Herald Courier.

Stafford dropped $165 to file three lawsuits in Russell County General District Court. One lawsuit was against the Lebanon DMV itself, and two were against specific employees.

On Dec. 10, a judge dismissed all the lawsuits when Stafford was provided all the phone numbers in court by a representative from the state’s attorney general.

Stafford has posted all of these numbers on his website.

“I think the backbone to our republic and our democracy is open government and transparency in government and it shocks me that a lot of people don’t know the power of FOIA,” Stafford told the Herald Courier.

Yet, Stafford wasn’t done.

Less than 24 hours later, he collected hundreds of rolls of pennies to pay his taxes at the DMV. He then hired 11 people at $10 an hour to help him break open the rolled coins. It took them four hours to do this, costing Stafford $440. He then bought the five wheelbarrows, which cost him another $400. All in all, Stafford spent $1,005 to get 10 phone numbers and drop off a bunch of pennies at the DMV.

Not to mention the $2,987.14 he had to pay in taxes, which he happily brought to the DMV on Wednesday morning.

The DMV had to accept his form of payment because the US Coinage Act of 1965 says that coins are “legal tender for all debts, public charges, taxes and dues.”

According to Stafford, the employees at the DMV did not cause a fuss.

“The DMV employees are being very respectful and accommodating considering the situation,” he wrote on his website.

 

 

 

 

Via: Man Paid DMV With 298,745 Pennies In Pettiest Revenge Scheme Ever